Sharp Fret Ends

I live in Phoenix, AZ. It’s extremely dry here and if you live in a dry climate you have most certainly picked up a guitar with an unbound fretboard and found the frets sharp and uncomfortable due to the neck shrinking. This is such a common problem, especially on Fender guitars, ¬†that I’ve done nearly 20 of these jobs in the last 2 months. I figured I’d share my method because it’s extremely easy. I would not use this exact method on a very valuable guitar, for those I will tape off the fretboard and generally be far more careful with finish and even the final shape of the fret ends, but since most guitars are “players”, this is the most common method I use…This example is a MIM Strat with really sharp frets…

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The frets are protruding and the bottom corners are very sharp…The first step is to tape off the side of the neck with blue masking tape right below the bottom of the fret tang…

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This not only protects the finish, but it will provide a “stop” when you begin sanding. The tape will keep you from taking off more than just the protruding frets. You’ll hit the finish just a tad, but we’ll remedy that later…Once the neck is taped off, get a hard, flat sanding block. I use a small piece of maple, sanded flat. ¬†Attach 400grit paper to the flat side and sand the edge of the neck (the fret ends) with the block, perpendicular to the board…

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Do this until you can no longer feel the frets underneath the block…in other words, once the block glides smoothly along the edge of the neck STOP and move on to the other side. It will usually take 2 pieces of sandpaper. Once the tangs are sanded smooth, tilt the block in to match the bevel of the fret ends and sand lightly…

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Now the frets should be more comfortable BUT you’re gonna need to take care of the bottom of the fret ends. Use a 3-corner file to lightly file the bottom corners. 2 quick, light swipes on both sides will be sufficient…

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Now you’ll want to clean up the file marks and the sanding you’ve done. The best option is Micro Mesh.

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Go thru each grit, concentrating on the fret ends but also hitting the edge of the neck above the tape…this will polish up any sanding marks on the finish. One cool side effect of this method is that the fretboard edges will get just slightly rolled like an old vintage guitar. Before moving on to the next grits it’s a good idea to gently hit the top of the frets, and even the board, just a tad to clean them up. This is a few quick swipes up and down the board with each grit…

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Once you’re thru all the grits the fret ends should be nice and polished. Clean and oil the board, and it’s all done…

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Cheers!

 

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Fender Roadworn Tele

A friend recently brought me two of his Teles, one was a stock Fender Roadworn and the other was a parts tele…Warmoth neck on an American Tele body. Neither of them was “useful” to him anymore so we discussed what to do. We decided to mod the Roadworn body, adding an offset vibrato, a B-5 conversion plate with a Mastery Bridge (by far the best offset bridge available…if you have a Jazzmaster or Jaguar, etc, and you don’t have a Mastery on it, GET ONE!), and use the Warmoth neck which was a beautiful flame maple neck w/ rosewood board. The neck however had been finished years before by another builder and was not up to par…thick finish with a badly applied decal…so we decided we’d refin the front of the headstock, black it out, and add my company logo in metallic green. I also modded the electronics just a bit, replacing the stock capacitor with an Emerson PIO cap (available from Stew Mac and a very good cap. I prefer NOS Cornell-Dubilier, Sprague Vitatmin-Q’s, or Russian military caps on my custom builds, but the Emerson works fantastic as an upgrade to stock electronics). In the end we arrived at a whole new guitar, here’s the end result…

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Model PT

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Curly maple back and sides, Sitka spruce top, ebony binding w/flamed sycamore lines, and maple burl end graft.

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Scoop cutaway.

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This model is my answer to the current resurgence of the Parlor guitar. It has a small, asymmetrical body (though it doesn’t look like it at first glance), a 24.9″ scale and a 13th fret joint so that there are a full 12 frets above the body joint. It is a small guitar, but it has huge sound. The next one will be under construction shortly.

Cheers